Questions

Forming questions can be quite a task for some folks. But, it’s simpler than it’s thought to be.

When forming questions, all one needs to do is bring the first helping verb in the sentence to the front. If a sentence only has one main verb and no helping verbs, then we need to put such main verb in the front of the sentence.

(Helping verbs = to do; to be; to have)

Take a look at the following example:

He is watching TV.

In the above statement, the main verb is “watching” and the helping verb is “is,” which is a form of the helping verb “to be.” Hence, we bring the first helping verb (is) to the front of the sentence to form a question.

Is he watching TV?

Note: While forming questions in the Simple Present Tense and Simple Past Tense, we assume “do/does” and “did” as respective helping verbs though they do not appear in positive statements. Also, how we form questions in the past tense is quite different compared to other tenses (look below for explanation).

In this lesson, we’ll see how questions are formed in different tenses.

Simple Present Tense:

They play soccer everyday.

Do they play soccer everyday?

Present Continuous Tense:

The Smiths are having a party.

Are the Smiths having a party?

Present Perfect Tense:

They have finished their work.

Have they finished their work?

Present Perfect Continuous Tense:

We have been sleeping for 4 hours.

Have we been sleeping for 4 hours?

Simple Past Tense:

The conjugation to form questions in the Past Tense is:

{Did + subject + bare infinitive of the main verb}

He spoke to her yesterday.

Did he speak to her yesterday?

Past Continuous Tense:

She was working.

Was she working?

Past Perfect Tense:

The country had done terribly before he took office.

Had the country done terribly before he took office?

Past Perfect Continuous Tense:

They had been hunting for a CEO for 2 months when they found him.

Had they been hunting for a CEO for 2 months when they found him?

Simple Future Tense:

She will explain my job roles tomorrow.

Will she explain my job roles tomorrow?

Future Continuous Tense:

Kade will be traveling to his city tomorrow.

Will Kade be traveling to his city tomorrow?

Future Perfect Tense:

We will have visited all the sites by evening.

Will we have visited all the sites by evening?

Future Perfect Continuous Tense:

They will have been sleeping when I reach home.

Will they have been sleeping when I reach home?

Using what, where, when, why, who and how